«Civilization, while giving us such seemingly forward advances as modern medicine and spatulas, also has had a nasty side effect. It gave us more opportunities to sit on our butts. Whether learning or working, we gradually quit exercising the way our ancestors did. [—-]
Recall that our evolutionary ancestors were used to walking up to 12 miles per day. This means that our brains were supported for most of our evolutionary history by Olympic-caliber bodies. We were not used to sitting in a classroom for 8 hours at a stretch. We were not used to sitting in a cubicle for 8 hours at a stretch.
{—-] I am convinced that integrating exercise into those 8 hours at work or school will not make us smarter. It will only make us normal

— John Medina, Brain Rules
20:50
13
Sep
2014


1 notes
 

«It strikes me that these two branches of science fiction are actually conditioning us to accept our current situation. Dystopia readers are waiting for a Katniss – and then everything will be all right. Post-apocalypse readers know they’re currently better-off, even if they’re being oppressed, than they would be with gangs of marauding slavers, rapists and murderers roaming the countryside. Science fiction was once a literature which encouraged change, which explored ways and means to effect changes. Now it’s comfort reading, it makes us feel good about our reduced circumstances because at least we’re not suffering as much as the fictional characters we read about.
[…]
Once upon a time, science fiction was driven by an outward urge. True, we know a great deal more about our planet and our universe than we did then. But there is still a lot we don’t know – the depths of the oceans, for example, remain mostly unexplored. We’ve found over 1800 exoplanets, but the furthest we’ve trod is our own moon, 400,000 km away – and that was over forty years ago anyway. What happened to that urge? Where are the science fiction novels inspired by it? I can perhaps think of only a handful published in the past twelve to eighteen months which might qualify.»

Science fiction has lost the plot (via madddscience)
19:33
13
Sep
2014


297 notes
^reblogged from cyberpsychic. Source: iansales.com
 

missolivialouise:

Here’s a thing I’ve had around in my head for a while!

Okay, so I’m pretty sure that by now everyone at least is aware of Steampunk, with it’s completely awesome Victorian sci-fi aesthetic. But what I want to see is Solarpunk – a plausible near-future sci-fi genre, which I like to imagine as based on updated Art Nouveau, Victorian, and Edwardian aesthetics, combined with a green and renewable energy movement to create a world in which children grow up being taught about building electronic tech as well as food gardening and other skills, and people have come back around to appreciating artisans and craftspeople, from stonemasons and smithies, to dress makers and jewelers, and everyone in between. A balance of sustainable energy-powered tech, environmental cities, and wicked cool aesthetics. 

A lot of people seem to share a vision of futuristic tech and architecture that looks a lot like an ipod – smooth and geometrical and white. Which imo is a little boring and sterile, which is why I picked out an Art Nouveau aesthetic for this.

With energy costs at a low, I like to imagine people being more inclined to focus their expendable income on the arts!

Aesthetically my vision of solarpunk is very similar to steampunk, but with electronic technology, and an Art Nouveau veneer.

So here are some buzz words~

Natural colors!
Art Nouveau!
Handcrafted wares!
Tailors and dressmakers!
Streetcars!
Airships!
Stained glass window solar panels!!!
Education in tech and food growing!
Less corporate capitalism, and more small businesses!
Solar rooftops and roadways!
Communal greenhouses on top of apartments!
Electric cars with old-fashioned looks!
No-cars-allowed walkways lined with independent shops!
Renewable energy-powered Art Nouveau-styled tech life!

Can you imagine how pretty it would be to have stained glass windows everywhere that are actually solar panels? The tech is already headed in that direction!  Or how about wide-brim hats, or parasols that are topped with discreet solar panel tech incorporated into the design, with ports you can stick your phone charger in to?

(((Character art by me; click the cityscape pieces to see artist names)))

18:03
13
Sep
2014


35614 notes
^reblogged from missolivialouise.
 

wilhelminaslayter:

jenniferstolzer:

shaggy2pope:

faetrouble:

hangthecode:

Jack was employed into service for the East India Trading Company and was given command of the Wicked Wench. However, after he set free a cargo of slaves, his employer, Cutler Beckett, had Jack branded as a pirate and the Wench set aflame and sunk. After failing to rescue the Wench, Sparrow struck a bargain with the ghostly captain of the Flying Dutchman, Davy Jones, to resurrect his beloved vessel. Jones returned the ship to Jack in near perfect condition except for the permanently charred hull. This prompted Jack to rename her the Black Pearl

(via)

Yo, this is why Norrington said he’s the “worst pirate I’ve ever heard of,” and then Jack followed it up with, “But you have heard of me.”

Because Jack was branded a Pirate because he freed people rather than stealing anything. So Norrington, with his sense of duty, knows that Jack has been branded a criminal for actively not being a terrible human being. Norrington is torn between his duty as a naval officer and knowing that Jack is right.

He freed exactly 100 people, that’s why his debt to Jones was 100 souls. Davy has a sick sense of irony after all. Jack freed 100 souls and as a consequence his ship got sunk. Now his ship has been raised and as a consequence, he has to enslave 100 souls. This explains his reluctance to actually pay back the debt.

Crap, the latter portion of this franchise was a lot smarter than I thought it was… 

There’s so much people don’t get about this franchise, the story is really more complex than just “funny drunken pirate meets hottie lady and hottie man with occasional visits from squid man”.

15:49
13
Sep
2014


437556 notes
^reblogged from myfavouritelunatic. Source: hangthecode
 
freken-o:

Stanislav the apple wants to be a test-pilot. But it will become juice, just like  dad.
Tanya Zadorozhnaya

freken-o:

Stanislav the apple wants to be a test-pilot. But it will become juice, just like  dad.

Tanya Zadorozhnaya

15:43
13
Sep
2014


zoom

2 notes
^reblogged from freken-o.
 

freken-o:

She’s ruthless. She’s brutal.

15:43
13
Sep
2014


160 notes
 
15:33
13
Sep
2014


610713 notes
^reblogged from freken-o. Source: uncomfortableconfusion
 
15:02
13
Sep
2014


692 notes
^reblogged from dash-digital. Source: cosmicwolfstorm
 
thekidshouldseethis:

Theo Jansen’s Strandbeests, wind-powered sculptures that walk on the beach.
Watch the video.

thekidshouldseethis:

Theo Jansen’s Strandbeests, wind-powered sculptures that walk on the beach.

Watch the video.

15:02
13
Sep
2014


806 notes
 

«

When my husband [Carl Sagan] died, because he was so famous and known for not being a believer, many people would come up to me — it still sometimes happens — and ask me if Carl changed at the end and converted to a belief in an afterlife. They also frequently ask me if I think I will see him again.

Carl faced his death with unflagging courage and never sought refuge in illusions. The tragedy was that we knew we would never see each other again. I don’t ever expect to be reunited with Carl. But, the great thing is that when we were together, for nearly twenty years, we lived with a vivid appreciation of how brief and precious life is. We never trivialized the meaning of death by pretending it was anything other than a final parting. Every single moment that we were alive and we were together was miraculous — not miraculous in the sense of inexplicable or supernatural. We knew we were beneficiaries of chance… That pure chance could be so generous and so kind… That we could find each other, as Carl wrote so beautifully in Cosmos, you know, in the vastness of space and the immensity of time… That we could be together for twenty years. That is something which sustains me and it’s much more meaningful.

The way he treated me and the way I treated him, the way we took care of each other and our family, while he lived. That is so much more important than the idea I will see him someday. I don’t think I’ll ever see Carl again. But I saw him. We saw each other. We found each other in the cosmos, and that was wonderful.

»

Ann Druyan (via theremina)
15:00
13
Sep
2014


10303 notes
^reblogged from rude-mechanicals. Source: whats-out-there
 

walkingfoxiest:

a post where I explain with images how foxes are the best thing ever, and how if you disagree you are obviously wrong

20:16
12
Sep
2014


244250 notes
^reblogged from myfavouritelunatic. Source:
 
20:13
12
Sep
2014


482199 notes
^reblogged from freken-o. Source: itcuddles
 
hiddleslokid:

lepreas:

stunningpicture:

Lions are fed frozen blood during the heatwave in Melbourne

that’s so sweet and so gross

O_______O



blood popsicles

hiddleslokid:

lepreas:

stunningpicture:

Lions are fed frozen blood during the heatwave in Melbourne

that’s so sweet and so gross

O_______O

blood popsicles

18:37
12
Sep
2014


zoom

242168 notes
 
17:44
12
Sep
2014


218 notes